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      01-12-2020, 08:55 PM   #23
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specifically to M2C

Anyone lowered on 265 30 19 front ?
Able to fit 10mm spacer or no? Photos would be greatly appreciated
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      01-12-2020, 09:51 PM   #24
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Stock setup is two sizes wider in the rear compared to the front. When getting wider tires it's recommended to stick to that ratio. Trying to stuff the widest tires without considering the ramifications will compromise performance. Three or four sizes wider rears compared to front? Can't tell you what to do with your car, but I can tell you to enjoy the massive understeer, bro's.
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      01-13-2020, 03:01 AM   #25
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What about 255/30 19? That should definitely fit even with the spacer as it's 0.3inch shorter than the 265/30
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      01-13-2020, 07:22 PM   #26
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We have done quite a bit of research on this subject. It turns out that a 265/285 tire setup is just not ideal given the OEM wheel widths. It is important to note that you are sacrificing sidewall support by fitting a tire that is "too wide" for the given wheel width. By running a tire that is bulging, you will negatively impact handling over stock.

To combat this, we ended up releasing a 19" wheel for the M2 and Competition models that allows for the 265/295 staggered fitment with relative ease. A 265/35-19 is a bit too tall up front and can cause rubbing issues under compression, therefore a 265/30-19 is recommended.

We paired a 265/30-19 and 295/30-19 R888R with our M2/M2C specific EC-7 wheels in a 19x9.5 ET28 and 19x10.5 ET45 respectively. This is a spacer free fitment for those on stock suspension. A spacer is required for those running the M Performance coilover or KW HAS kits.

There is a lot of good fitment and tire information in this detailed thread:

https://f87.bimmerpost.com/forums/sh....php?t=1600433

Here are a few photos from that test fitment!









- Max

Last edited by Expert@ApexRaceParts; 01-15-2020 at 05:34 PM..
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      01-14-2020, 11:26 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expert@ApexRaceParts View Post
We have done quite a bit of research on this subject. It turns out that a 265/285 tire setup is just not ideal given the OEM wheel widths. It is important to note that you are sacrificing sidewall support by fitting a tire that is "too wide" for the given wheel width. By running a tire that is bulging, you will negatively impact handling over stock.


- Max
There is ABSOLUTELY nothing wrong with running 265 on a 9" rim and 285 on a 10" rim. Do not spread misinformation to help sell your wheels.
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      01-14-2020, 12:52 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1s View Post
There is ABSOLUTELY nothing wrong with running 265 on a 9" rim and 285 on a 10" rim.
That is not entirely true. It is important to note that most high performance summer tires and most R compound tires do run much wider than "advertised". A 265mm tire on a 9" wheel can bulge quite a bit and is not ideal, a 265mm tire will fit much better on a 9.5" wheel. The same can be said for a 10" wheel with an aggressive 285mm tire.

If the tire brand and compound are on the aggressive side, fitment and performance would be impacted when compared to running the extra 0.5" of wheel width to give that extra bit of sidewall support.

- Max

Last edited by Expert@ApexRaceParts; 01-14-2020 at 08:00 PM..
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      01-14-2020, 07:28 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expert@ApexRaceParts View Post
That is not entirely true. It is important to note that most high performance summer tires and most R compound tires do run much wider than "advertised". A 265mm wheel on a 9" wheel can bulge quite a bit and is not ideal, a 265mm tire will fit much better on a 9.5" wheel. The same can be said for a 10" wheel with an aggressive 285mm tire.

If the tire brand and compound are on the aggressive side, fitment and performance would be impacted when compared to running the extra 0.5" of wheel width to give that extra bit of sidewall support.

- Max
No, you are entirely not true. So provide proof and your "quite a bit of research on this subject". Because extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

The fact is, in my personal experience RE71R and Sottozero Serie II do not bulge the OEM wheels. That being a 265/35 on the front 9" and a 285/35 on the rear 10". The sottozeros that I have are actually slightly wider than the RE71R too.

Additionally, both everyone in the forums and tire shops agree that 285 is perfectly acceptable for a 10". Can't actually find anyone who says a 295 or 305 isn't okay, actually, either. So if you want to go against tons of different people who have tested multiple tires on the 437m wheels, as well as multiple tire mfgs and retailers that say 285 is fine for a 10" wheel, the provide proof. Otherwise, everything you say is marketing nonsense to sell wheels, in my view. Which does an incredible disservice to the community and the people who believe you because they don't know any better.

https://f87.bimmerpost.com/forums/sh...2&postcount=23
https://f80.bimmerpost.com/forums/sh...&postcount=199
https://f80.bimmerpost.com/forums/sh....php?t=1349434
https://f80.bimmerpost.com/forums/sh....php?t=1421086
https://f80.bimmerpost.com/forums/sh....php?t=1414210
https://f87.bimmerpost.com/forums/sh....php?t=1464923

Additional evidence:
Absolutely every tire mfg on tirerack reccomends a 9.5"-11" wheel for their 285/35 tire. And some even recommend 9" wheels
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/TireS...earDiameter=17

Absolutely every tire mfg on tirerack reccomends a 9"-10.5" wheel for their 265/35 tire. And some even recommend wheels as narrow as 8.5" and as wide as 11" for their 265/35 tires.
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/TireS...earDiameter=17

https://www.tyres-pneus-online.co.uk...ce-advice.html
https://www.tyresizecalculator.com/c...rim-size-chart

This isn't just a BMW thing either. Every single Porsche, Mustang, and Corvette forum sees no problem with a 285/35 on a 10" rim, some cars even come from the factory like this, and say even wider is fine.

So two things you have to prove here:
1: A 285/35 bulges out of a 10" wheel, or a 265/35 bulges out of a 9" wheel.
2: That the amount of bulge negatively impacts handling and is dangerous.

Otherwise everything you are saying is hogwash.
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      01-14-2020, 08:28 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1s View Post
So two things you have to prove here:
1: A 285/35 bulges out of a 10" wheel, or a 265/35 bulges out of a 9" wheel.
2: That the amount of bulge negatively impacts handling and is dangerous.
While I agree with most everything you said, I will say that a tire that is slightly stretched will provide not only better turn-in, but take a set quicker, and be more predictable (which I'm sure you already know). However, that is NOT to say that a bit of a bulge would be dangerous.
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      01-14-2020, 08:39 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expert@ApexRaceParts View Post
We paired a 265/30-19 and 295/30-19 R888R with our EC-7 wheels in a 19x9.5 ET28 and 19x10.5 ET45 respectively. This is a spacer free fitment for those on stock suspension.
The 265/30 + 285/30 is a better general fitment for those size wheels, actually, with a better matched shoulder, and rake profile (stock rake is .5" front to rear, this would be .3" rake, generally). This is why Dinan uses these sizes.

The 265/30 + 295/30 is perfectly fine as well, but the shoulder profile won't quite match, and the rake is a bit tall (about .8, depending on the tire, of course) because of the taller sidewall. And with said taller sidewall, if the owner doesn't plan to drop the car, then the front to rear tire gap that's already bad will only get visually worse.
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      01-15-2020, 05:12 PM   #32
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Thank you for your detailed response, but it seems that my original point might have been lost. Let me explain a bit more clearly.

The reason we do not recommend a 265mm tire on a 9” wheel is due to the lack of sidewall support when compared to a 245mm or 255mm tire on a 9” wheel. That is not to say that a 265mm tire cannot work on a 9” wheel or is dangerous or unsafe, but it can and will impact the performance, handling characteristics (feedback to the driver) and wear patterns of the tire in question. When you consider the fact that many extreme summer, r-comp and semi-slick track oriented compounds notoriously run wider than your average 265 street tire, the lack of sidewall support from a 9” wheel is amplified and becomes increasingly more apparent to the driver - especially upon initial turn-in and throughout a corner when the weight of the vehicle is transferred and the tire sidewalls are experiencing extreme loads.

When fitting a wheel and tire package to any car, many individuals believe that wide tires unequivocally result in more performance. That is not always the case. A crucial variable to take into consideration is maximizing sidewall support on whatever size tire you plan on using. When the sidewall of a tire is supported correctly, the tire can perform much more linearly across its traction range. If the sidewall is not well supported, the tire sidewall can flex and fold over during turn-in and throughout corners. The sidewall is not designed to withstand the same adhesion requirements as the main treadblock of a tire, and this folding over can result in less traction and undesired understeer/oversteer given the situation.

Generally speaking, the consensus of many racers is that in order to extract the most performance out of a given compound and to maximize the tires contact patch, you’ll want to use a wheel width that is at the wider end of a tire manufacturer's recommended wheel width spectrum. Tire sidewall construction varies from compound to compound, so some tire models are more sensitive to this than others.

There are always exceptions to the rule. Many racers are bound to class rules, for example, SCCA street class mandates that you run the stock wheel widths of a given vehicle with an offset that is +/- 7mm. In these instances, while drivers cannot run wider wheel widths, they will certainly maximize tire width to gain as much grip as possible.

At the end of the day, hard core track enthusaists and racers are always looking for ways of getting an edge over “the competition”. There are many decisions and incremental improvements that can be made which directly increase performance and/or instill more confidence in the driver, all resulting in superior lap times.

I do hope that this provided clarity to my previous posts.

- Max
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      01-15-2020, 05:47 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expert@ApexRaceParts View Post
Thank you for your detailed response, but it seems that my original point might have been lost. Let me explain a bit more clearly.

The reason we do not recommend a 265mm tire on a 9” wheel is due to the lack of sidewall support when compared to a 245mm or 255mm tire on a 9” wheel. That is not to say that a 265mm tire cannot work on a 9” wheel or is dangerous or unsafe, but it can and will impact the performance, handling characteristics (feedback to the driver) and wear patterns of the tire in question. When you consider the fact that many extreme summer, r-comp and semi-slick track oriented compounds notoriously run wider than your average 265 street tire, the lack of sidewall support from a 9” wheel is amplified and becomes increasingly more apparent to the driver - especially upon initial turn-in and throughout a corner when the weight of the vehicle is transferred and the tire sidewalls are experiencing extreme loads.

When fitting a wheel and tire package to any car, many individuals believe that wide tires unequivocally result in more performance. That is not always the case. A crucial variable to take into consideration is maximizing sidewall support on whatever size tire you plan on using. When the sidewall of a tire is supported correctly, the tire can perform much more linearly across its traction range. If the sidewall is not well supported, the tire sidewall can flex and fold over during turn-in and throughout corners. The sidewall is not designed to withstand the same adhesion requirements as the main treadblock of a tire, and this folding over can result in less traction and undesired understeer/oversteer given the situation.

Generally speaking, the consensus of many racers is that in order to extract the most performance out of a given compound and to maximize the tires contact patch, you’ll want to use a wheel width that is at the wider end of a tire manufacturer's recommended wheel width spectrum. Tire sidewall construction varies from compound to compound, so some tire models are more sensitive to this than others.

There are always exceptions to the rule. Many racers are bound to class rules, for example, SCCA street class mandates that you run the stock wheel widths of a given vehicle with an offset that is +/- 7mm. In these instances, while drivers cannot run wider wheel widths, they will certainly maximize tire width to gain as much grip as possible.

At the end of the day, hard core track enthusaists and racers are always looking for ways of getting an edge over “the competition”. There are many decisions and incremental improvements that can be made which directly increase performance and/or instill more confidence in the driver, all resulting in superior lap times.

I do hope that this provided clarity to my previous posts.

- Max
Ok, you're just doubled down on the same exact nonsense you have as before. You haven't provided a single thing to prove your point, nor a single thing to counter anything I've brought up. Like I opened with, there is absolutely nothing wrong with a 265 on a 9" rim or a 285 on a 10" rim. The problems you attribute to it DO NOT exist.
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      01-15-2020, 08:23 PM   #34
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Sounds to me like OP is more concerned about the look so 265/30 and 285/30 is fine on stock wheels.
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      01-15-2020, 08:37 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1s View Post
Ok, you're just doubled down on the same exact nonsense you have as before. You haven't provided a single thing to prove your point, nor a single thing to counter anything I've brought up. Like I opened with, there is absolutely nothing wrong with a 265 on a 9" rim or a 285 on a 10" rim. The problems you attribute to it DO NOT exist.

After reviewing the discussion and my previous responses, I can appreciate your position on the topic and it was our mistake to speak in absolutes. As a performance-focused brand involved in motorsports, we are passionate about offering solutions to track enthusiasts and club racers that optimize wheel and tire configurations to their fullest potential. I can see that I am making some assumptions in regard to how M2 owners here on the forums may be enjoying their vehicles.

If an enthusiast is planning to upgrade their wheels and desires to run wider tire widths, we believe that taking the opportunity to increase wheel width respectively will yield superior results for the reasons mentioned in our last post. It sounds like we share different views on the topic, and that is okay as personal preferences play a big role in how we all modify our cars. Luckily, there are now a fair amount of options for wheel and tire configurations for the M2 & M2C.

You had asked for proof, and I apologize I did not address that request. Our professional recommendations come from 12+ years of researching and developing wheels for a variety of makes and models, more specifically for track and race applications, as well as our direct involvement in various levels of motorsports from sprint races to 25 hour endurance races. As you’ve pointed out, tire manufacturers list a range of tires sizes that are appropriate (safe) for a given wheel width, however, they do not tell you which of those wheel widths is going to yield the best results for a given application. That only comes from experience.

For those that would like to keep the stock wheels in place while increasing tire width, we agree that there is no problem or safety concern with installing 265/285 tires. While the 265’s on a 9” wheel may be a bit wide for our preference, street cars are not pushed to the limits where sidewall support would become an issue or pain point for the driver. 285mm tires mount up to 10” wheels quite nicely, and we recommend it to street customers often.

We appreciate the conversation. It is helpful as a community to debate specific topics in hopes of providing information that can be beneficial to all members.

- Max
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      01-15-2020, 10:15 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expert@ApexRaceParts View Post
Generally speaking, the consensus of many racers is that in order to extract the most performance out of a given compound and to maximize the tires contact patch, you’ll want to use a wheel width...
The contact patch has literally nothing to do with the width of the wheel or the size of the tire. It's simply a product of the weight of the vehicle and the air pressure in the tire.

Put another way, fitted to the same car, and inflated to the same psi, a 245 on a 9" wheel and a 305 on an 11" wheel will have the exact same contact patch area, they will just be different shapes.

And going even further, all these guys fitting 285's and 295's thinking they will get better acceleration are absolutely confused. All they are getting is a different handling car, and any increased acceleration grip is down to new tires vs the old, or a stickier compound.

Strictly speaking, for acceleration you want a long contact patch front to back (take a look at what happens to the tire of a Top Fuel dragster for confirmation), and for handling you want a wide contact patch side to side (re: F1 or any other handling motorsport, especially auto-x).
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      01-15-2020, 10:41 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expert@ApexRaceParts View Post
After reviewing the discussion and my previous responses, I can appreciate your position on the topic and it was our mistake to speak in absolutes. As a performance-focused brand involved in motorsports, we are passionate about offering solutions to track enthusiasts and club racers that optimize wheel and tire configurations to their fullest potential. I can see that I am making some assumptions in regard to how M2 owners here on the forums may be enjoying their vehicles.

If an enthusiast is planning to upgrade their wheels and desires to run wider tire widths, we believe that taking the opportunity to increase wheel width respectively will yield superior results for the reasons mentioned in our last post. It sounds like we share different views on the topic, and that is okay as personal preferences play a big role in how we all modify our cars. Luckily, there are now a fair amount of options for wheel and tire configurations for the M2 & M2C.

You had asked for proof, and I apologize I did not address that request. Our professional recommendations come from 12+ years of researching and developing wheels for a variety of makes and models, more specifically for track and race applications, as well as our direct involvement in various levels of motorsports from sprint races to 25 hour endurance races. As you’ve pointed out, tire manufacturers list a range of tires sizes that are appropriate (safe) for a given wheel width, however, they do not tell you which of those wheel widths is going to yield the best results for a given application. That only comes from experience.

For those that would like to keep the stock wheels in place while increasing tire width, we agree that there is no problem or safety concern with installing 265/285 tires. While the 265’s on a 9” wheel may be a bit wide for our preference, street cars are not pushed to the limits where sidewall support would become an issue or pain point for the driver. 285mm tires mount up to 10” wheels quite nicely, and we recommend it to street customers often.

We appreciate the conversation. It is helpful as a community to debate specific topics in hopes of providing information that can be beneficial to all members.

- Max
We can try this differently, in a way that would be more helpful to the community.

How specifically does a 295/30R19 on a 10.5" wheel behave differently than a 285/35R19 on a 10" wheel? What are the aspects you believe the 295 combo performs better in? And what is specifically negative about the handling of the 285 combo? Maybe my logic is wrong and you have good reasons for believing this. But it can't be bulge, because both combos are proportionally the same in that aspect.
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      01-15-2020, 11:40 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VisualEcho View Post
The 265/30 + 285/30 is a better general fitment for those size wheels, actually, with a better matched shoulder, and rake profile (stock rake is .5" front to rear, this would be .3" rake, generally). This is why Dinan uses these sizes.

The 265/30 + 295/30 is perfectly fine as well, but the shoulder profile won't quite match, and the rake is a bit tall (about .8, depending on the tire, of course) because of the taller sidewall. And with said taller sidewall, if the owner doesn't plan to drop the car, then the front to rear tire gap that's already bad will only get visually worse.
Agreed. We discussed many of the different tire possibilities in our M2C discussion thread we referenced above. While a staggered 265/30-19 front, 285/30-19 rear is desirable for the reasons you mentioned, lack of tire availability in that rear tire size can push many enthusiasts (especially track enthusiasts) to the 295/30-19 where there are more performance-oriented compounds available.

We had access to the 265/295 R888R, and since many of our customers are in pursuit of r-compounds for HPDE's, we thought we would examine and share that configuration. We also really like the Michelin PS4S as a performance street tire, but unfortunately, they are not available in 285/30-19 either. There is a lot more support from tire manufacturers in a 19" diameter than there used to be, so we're hoping more good options become available.

For reference, I've pasted the tire list from that thread below.

Tire Availability - Staggered Configurations

F: 265/30-19 / R: 285/30-19

Performance Street
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91
Firestone Firehawk Indy 500

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track and Competition
None available

Semi-slicks & Slicks
None available

F: 265/30-19 / R: 295/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track and Competition
Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 * APEX favorite *
Pirelli P Zero Trofeo R * APEX favorite *
Toyo R888R

Semi-slicks & Slicks
None available

F: 275/30-19 / R: 295/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track and Competition
None available

Semi-slicks & Slicks
None available

F: 275/30-19 / R: 305/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Continental Extremecontact Sport
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track and Competition
None available

Semi-slicks
None available


Tire Availability - Rotatable Square Configurations

F&R: 265/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track & Competition
Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 * APEX favorite *
Pirelli P Zero Trofeo R * APEX favorite *
Toyo R888R

Semi-slicks & Slicks
None available

F&R: 275/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Continental Extremecontact Sport
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91
Firestone Firehawk Indy 500
Dunlop Direzza DZ102

Extreme Summer
Nitto NT05

Streetable Track & Competition
None available

Semi-Slicks
None Available


EDIT: I should also mention, Bridgestone RE-71Rs is a very popular Extreme Summer Tire among track enthusiasts, and they can be ran in 255/35-19 front, 275/35-19 rear.

Last edited by Expert@ApexRaceParts; 01-15-2020 at 11:57 PM..
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      01-15-2020, 11:55 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expert@ApexRaceParts View Post
While a staggered 265/30-19 front, 285/30-19 rear is desirable for the reasons you mentioned, lack of tire availability in that rear tire size can push many enthusiasts (especially track enthusiasts) to the 295/30-19 where there are more performance-oriented compounds available.
Agreed. And the worst part about it, to me, is that it's pervasive. I've had this issue going all the way back to the 80's with a myriad of cars. Unless the car is AWD, or you have your wheels made 100% custom, you're probably never going to get what you really want with regards to tires.

I will say that many Michelin-snooty BMW owners are overlooking the Firehawk Indy, which comes in correct sizes, and is a damn fine performance tire, even with how inexpensive it is.
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      01-16-2020, 01:32 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VisualEcho View Post
I will say that many Michelin-snooty BMW owners are overlooking the Firehawk Indy, which comes in correct sizes, and is a damn fine performance tire, even with how inexpensive it is.
That was an issue I had with this thread. Almost like because OP didn't want to get Michelins he was getting crucified for it. Just because he said the word "cheap" doesn't mean bottom of the barrel $50 each tire. He just wants something cheaper than Michelins which I can understand. There are diminishing returns when it comes to products. You could probably get like 95% of the performance for 70% of the price.
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      01-16-2020, 01:54 AM   #41
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For reference only, the Audi RS5 fits 275 rubbers on 9" rims from the factory and works well, so 265/285 can be mounted without any issue on 9"/10" oem M2 wheels. It's more a matter of appearance, someone could prefer a more staggered effect, someone else a more square effect.
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      01-16-2020, 02:50 AM   #42
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Yokohama

AD-08R (Extreme Summer)
245/35, 265/35 19
255/35, 275/35 19
255/30, 275,30 19
265/30, 295/30 19
275/30, 305,30 19

A005 (Slick) & A006 (Wet)
Available in a number of sizes for 19 inches wheel

https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&r...6gswAmGHF7TvIX
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      01-16-2020, 03:00 AM   #43
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Bridgestone

RE-12D (R Compound Motorsports)
275/35R19 - Square setup

The Potenza range, RE-71R, RE-71RS and S007A all have various 19 inches size that is suitable for the M2 but may not be the best match
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      01-16-2020, 05:36 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Expert@ApexRaceParts View Post
Agreed. We discussed many of the different tire possibilities in our M2C discussion thread we referenced above. While a staggered 265/30-19 front, 285/30-19 rear is desirable for the reasons you mentioned, lack of tire availability in that rear tire size can push many enthusiasts (especially track enthusiasts) to the 295/30-19 where there are more performance-oriented compounds available.

We had access to the 265/295 R888R, and since many of our customers are in pursuit of r-compounds for HPDE's, we thought we would examine and share that configuration. We also really like the Michelin PS4S as a performance street tire, but unfortunately, they are not available in 285/30-19 either. There is a lot more support from tire manufacturers in a 19" diameter than there used to be, so we're hoping more good options become available.

For reference, I've pasted the tire list from that thread below.

Tire Availability - Staggered Configurations

F: 265/30-19 / R: 285/30-19

Performance Street
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91
Firestone Firehawk Indy 500

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track and Competition
None available

Semi-slicks & Slicks
None available

F: 265/30-19 / R: 295/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track and Competition
Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 * APEX favorite *
Pirelli P Zero Trofeo R * APEX favorite *
Toyo R888R

Semi-slicks & Slicks
None available

F: 275/30-19 / R: 295/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track and Competition
None available

Semi-slicks & Slicks
None available

F: 275/30-19 / R: 305/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Continental Extremecontact Sport
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track and Competition
None available

Semi-slicks
None available


Tire Availability - Rotatable Square Configurations

F&R: 265/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91

Extreme Summer
None available

Streetable Track & Competition
Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 * APEX favorite *
Pirelli P Zero Trofeo R * APEX favorite *
Toyo R888R

Semi-slicks & Slicks
None available

F&R: 275/30-19

Performance Street
Michelin Pilot Sport 4S * APEX favorite *
Continental Extremecontact Sport
Hankook Ventus V12 Evo2
Kumho Ecsta PS91
Firestone Firehawk Indy 500
Dunlop Direzza DZ102

Extreme Summer
Nitto NT05

Streetable Track & Competition
None available

Semi-Slicks
None Available


EDIT: I should also mention, Bridgestone RE-71Rs is a very popular Extreme Summer Tire among track enthusiasts, and they can be ran in 255/35-19 front, 275/35-19 rear.
Thx for your listing, Max!

Just wanted to ask for your recommendation:
I've got a set of Protrack One in 10x18 +20 and 10,5x18 +40 and plan to run 265/35 front and 285/35 rear. Car is lowered on KW CS 3-way.
Would you think, 265/30 and 285/30 (or even 295/30) is a better choice?
The wheel set is only for track use.
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